More Dame Detectives

 

ADD THESE TO YOUR LIST OF WOMAN P.I.s

Liza Cody Anna Lee debuted in the late 1970s-early’80s, predating Grafton and Paretsky. I treasured every title that appeared. Anna is a former policewoman who goes to work as a P.I. with an agency in London but is adept at working on her own. (The author also did a very poignant series featuring a female wrestler.)

Jacqueline Winspear Maisie Dobbs opens her small office in London in 1929 and bills herself as a “psychologist and investigator”. She comes from a working class background and served as a nurse in the Great War. She employs a male assistant, a character and relationship which is nicely done. Maisie continues to be enthralled by the man who trained her in the emerging science of psychology.

R.E. Conary Rachel Cord is ex-Army turned P.I., and appears in three novels, the latest out earlier this year. They evoke the gritty, hardboiled, pulp novel origins of the P.I. genre and are not for squeamish readers. There is violence (often sadistic) coupled with good writing and plotting. It’s noir, and I found it enjoyable, though some may be discomfited by a lesbian P.I.

About mruthmyers

Welcome to the spot for aficionados of the 1940s, strong women protagonists and private eye novels. Shamus Award winning mystery writer M. Ruth Myers, author of the Maggie Sullivan mysteries and other novels, is your host. Share stories of your female relatives on the WW2 homefront. Find new books. Most of all have fun!

Posted on June 9, 2013, in Authors and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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